Wired rings that I made

A couple of weeks ago, I took a class on how to make wired rings. I finally got around to finishing them now. We learned how to make six styles in all. Everyone got the same kinds and colors of beads to use, which explains why some of them are not what I would choose, but we brought our own wire.

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The numbers indicate the order in which they were made.

These rings are made by wrapping wire around a mandrel. We first needed to find our ring size for the fingers we wanted to wear the rings on. I prefer to wear rings on my index fingers, so I made my rings accordingly. Unfortunately, it’s easy for the wire to slip on the mandrel from one size to another, or for the coil to loosen after removing it from the mandrel, as many of my classmates experienced. I was lucky that most of my rings ended up the correct size or close enough. For all of them except #6, we were taught to wrap the wire one size larger than the desired size. For #6, it was half a size larger. This is necessary because wrapping the wires around the shank (to secure the ends and keep the ring together) will make the ring smaller.

My first ring was kind of messed up but it was still wearable. The second one turned out nice, but I think the third one (with the button bead made from bone) turned out the best out of all the ones I made that day. It was actually the easiest one to make.

My “rose” ring (#4) ended up much larger than I intended because I accidentally unhooked the connection between the two ends of the wire. (I was aiming to make it a 6.5, but it ended up a size 10.) I didn’t feel like picking at the coils to make them look more like rose petals out of fear of destroying the whole thing. It’s green because I didn’t want to use my silver wire for it and the only other 20 gauge wire that I had with me that day was green. It was the design I was least interested in, but it might look lovely in pink if I ever buy pink wire.

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I hope to redo the one with the three crystals, since it was done a bit messy. I think I will use a different silver plated wire that is dead soft copper instead of half hard, so it’ll be easier to work with.

The last ring we made was the one with dangles. At first I wasn’t too enthusiastic about it, but after finishing it, I like what I got. We ran out of time to complete that one in class, so I finished making the dangles on my own. Everyone’s designs probably turned out different. I was afraid of accidentally cracking the crystals while making a wrapped loop, so I made simple loops when crystals were right under the loop. But to have balance (3 simple loops, 3 wrapped loops), I hesitantly made a wrapped loop for the last crystal I added. I also was concerned that simple loops might get pulled open too easily and I would lose the crystals (even though this is 20 gauge medium temper wire). I didn’t want to only make coils at the bottom of all of them, so I tried (for the first time) the design with the three loops, which I had seen in a book. Once again, there were 3 coils and 3 of those loopy things, for balance.

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I am happy with the result.

We were told to file the edges of the wire where it was cut, so it wouldn’t be sharp and cut the wearer. Yesterday I finally got around to filing them, but after filing two of them, I decided I didn’t want to file the rest. It felt as though the filing made the surface rough when it originally was smooth. (I used a flush cutter, so it’s not like the wire is pointed.) It also took off the silver coating and exposed the copper underneath, which is unsightly.

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